Fiat logo design evolution

fiat logos

Founded in 1899 by a group of investors, most noticeably Giovanni Agnelli, Fiat manufactures automobile and railroad vehicles and also made tanks and aircraft during WWII.

With factories in Italy, Brazil, Argentina and Poland, as well as joint ventures in half a dozen other countries Fiat is currently the 6th largest car maker in the world.

Having sported more than a dozen distinct logo designs over the last century, the only consistent feature throughout has been their signature “A”. Show here is a brief history of the Fiat logo evolution.

fiat logo
1899.

fiat logo
1901.

car logo design
1904.

car logo design
1921.

car logo design
1925.

fiat logos
1929.

fiat logos
1931.

car logo design
1932.

fiat logo designs
1938.

car logo design
1959.

fiat logo designs
1968.

logo design
1999.

car logo design
2001.

logo design
2006.

What do you think?

I’ve never been a fan of the Fiat typography, I know the “A” is a key characteristic of the logo, but when viewed at a distance ( like while driving for instance… ) it always struck me as FIRT.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the Fiat company history.

5 thoughts on “Fiat logo design evolution”

  1. Interesting post Andrew.

    From looking at the years and my limited knowledge of classic cars, I think the logos are also adapted to the changing shapes and styles of cars. If I look at the years and try to imagine what cars looked like then I understand a bit more about why the shape has changed.

    Of course today cars come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, but a long time ago they all used to look pretty similar compared to today and they had similar grills, bonnets etc.

    Very useful, working on creating a brand and logo myself at the moment.

  2. This is a great post, you can really see the fashions of the times through the logo designs. My favourite has to be the 1899… bookmarked!

  3. Thanks for this. It’s always interesting to see the evolution of long-lived brands. I really like the 2006 version. I like how it evokes the 1930s versions.

    I never noticed the FIRT thing. Now I can’t stop seeing it. Thanks a lot.

  4. No problem, Shaun.

    Sorry if I’ve ruined the logo for you with the “FIRT” reference, ha.

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